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Extension > Agricultural Business Management News > Prevented Planting Rules for Corn and Soybeans

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Prevented Planting Rules for Corn and Soybeans

By David Bau, Extension Educator

It has been another wet spring in 2016 and many farmers might have not been able to get all of their farmland planted on time, or by final planting dates for crop insurance of May 31st for Corn and June 10th for Soybeans, for most of Minnesota.  Producers have three choices when they are unable to plant the originally planned crop on time.

  1. Plant the original crop with lower yields expected
  2. Plant an alternative crop 
  3. Abandon the acres and plant a cover crop.
There were some areas that received a late frost on emerged crops.  Farmers have several options here:
  • Leave the damaged crop as is
  • Replant the same crop
  • Plant a different crop
  • Abandon the acres and plant a cover crop.
Multi-Peril Crop Insurance policies include a 25 day late planting period.

In Minnesota this period begins after the final planting date which is May 31st for corn and June 10th for soybeans, with June 1 - 25th as the late planting period for corn and June 11th - July 5th as the late planting period for soybeans.

There are later dates for Northern Minnesota which includes: final planting date of May 25th for corn and June 10th for soybeans. The late planting period runs from May 26th - June 19th for corn and June 11th - July 5th for soybeans. These northern counties include: Aitkin, Carlton, Cass, Itasca, St Louis counties.

Final Plant Dates for Iowa are May 31st for Corn and June 15th for Soybeans, for South Dakota May 25th for Corn in north and May 31st for rest of state and June 10th for Soybeans, for Wisconsin May 25th for Corn in Ashland, Sawyer, Bayfield, Douglas, Iron counties and May 31st for rest of state and June 10th for Soybeans in north and June 15th for balance of state.


Coverage for crops planted during the late period loses 1% of coverage each day the crop is planted after the final planting date.  For most of Minnesota, on June 1st the coverage would be 99% of original coverage and decline all the way to June 25th, where there would be 75% of the original coverage as indicated on Figure 1 below.  After day 26, it would be steady at 60%.


If a farmer chooses to abandon the unplanted acres they will receive 60 percent payment of the original guarantee. In order to be eligible for a prevented planting payment, the area that was prevented from being planted must be at least the lesser of 20 acres or 20% of the insurable crop acres in the unit. The acreage that was prevented from being planted does not need to be contiguous. The indemnity received on prevented planting acres is equal to 60% of the regular guarantee for that unit. Producers had the option to increase the coverage to 70% of the planted guarantee by selecting the PT option before sales closing date.

Your prevented planting indemnity on the unplanted acres will be 60% of your guarantee. For example, if your Actual Production History is 180 bu./acre and you elected 75% coverage and chose the revenue product, Crop Revenue Coverage, your guarantee would be:180 X 75% = 135 X $3.86 = $521.10. Your prevented planting indemnity would be $521.10 X 60% = $312.66. If you plant a second crop after the late planting period, you will receive only 35% of the prevented planting indemnity and you must insure the second crop and pay the full premium on the second crop.

You cannot have a prevented planting claim until after the final planting date for the crop. Additionally, you cannot plant any crop including a cover crop during the late planting period which is 25 days after the final planting date for corn & soybeans. If you plant any crop during the late planting period, you do not have a prevented planting claim.

You must submit a notice of loss on a prevented planting claim within 72 hours of the time that you determined that you will not be able to plant the crop, but no later than 72 hours after the end of the late planting period.

The Group Risk Plans of Insurance, GRP & GRIP do not cover prevented planting. You can plant corn or soybeans after the final planting date. If you have questions about the final plant dates for a specific county please call your Crop Insurance Agent.

You are able to find factsheets and more information on prevented planting on the Risk Management Agency’s website by selecting Prevented Planting.

Prevented Planting coverage provides a payment to growers when they are unable to plant their crops due to an insurable cause. Perils covered are weather related and include drought. Prevented planting coverage for the same insured cause of loss event can continue up to two years.  Acreage prevented from being planted must remain idle or be planted to a cover crop (not intended to be hayed, grazed, or otherwise harvested or is hayed or grazed on or after November 1 of the current crop year) to be eligible for 100% of the applicable prevented planting payment.

Maximum eligible prevented planting crop acreage is limited to the maximum number of acres certified for APH purposes or reported for insurance for the crop in any one of the four most recent calendar years. If an insured has not produced any crop for which insurance was available in any of the four most recent calendar years, eligible acres will be the number of acres specified on an intended acreage report (not to exceed the number of acres of cropland in the farming operation).

If you decide to plant and insure a second crop there are some restrictions:

  • The second crop may NOT be planted until after the end of the late planting period for the first insured crop. 
  • Second crop acres must be reported on the acreage report and production must be kept separate.
  • Indemnity will be 35% payment on the first crop and a premium of 35% will be due. 
  • This includes a volunteer or cover crop that is hayed, grazed or harvested from the same acreage before November 1, 2016. 
  • A cover crop may be planted on the acreage without indemnity reduction as long as it is not harvested, hayed or grazed. 
  • Most prevented planting acres are left idle or possibly planted to winter wheat later with no indemnity reduction.

If you DO NOT plant a Second Crop the indemnity will be 100% payment on the first crop and 100% of the premium will be due on the first crop. If it is determined that a second crop is planted in the first crop late planting period, the first crop will not be eligible for prevented planting payment.

The prevented planting indemnity for any eligible acreage will be calculated based on your price election or your projected price. Harvest Price will not be taken into consideration for indemnity purposes on prevented planting claims. Prevented planting acres will be measured by the adjuster and acres or intended crop cannot be revised after the initial acreage report is signed.

Only ONE Prevented Planting payment may be received by the insured or any other person (excluding share arrangement) for each acre for the crop year, unless the insured meets the requirement for double cropping. Double cropping must be an insurable practice in the county for the crop.

In summary, upon reaching the final planting date, farmers should consider the prevented planting alternative as it could be an economically attractive alternative.

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